What Flushable Wipes Really Do To The Atlanta Sewer System

There’s a problem with the sewer system around town. Flushable wipes are doing a number on our pipes.

They come in all kinds of packaging, and make all kinds of promises. 

Long before flushable wipes hit the marketplace, baby wipes grew in popularity as the perfect way to keep baby clean. Most people didn’t think of flushing them; they were thrown away with diapers. 

But then came the promise of a cleaner you; flushable wipes entered the scene with new excitement for marketers and companies alike. What Flushable Wipes Really Do To The Atlanta Sewer System

If flushable wipes are flushable, why aren’t baby wipes? Or makeup remover wipes? Or other household cleaning wipes? Suddenly, the general population didn’t see a difference, and the flushing began. 

It didn’t take long for problems to start popping up everywhere. Like this recent mess in Charleston. 

While wipes might be marketed as a substitute for toilet paper, your pipes don’t agree. Wipes are made from a material called “air laid paper” and are often interlaced with chemicals and scents. This makes the material tougher than toilet paper, meaning it doesn’t disintegrate as easily. 

As they move down into the system, they don’t break down, and instead, start clinging to other debris in the pipes. They twist and turn, forming blockages, and build in mass and strength as they connect with other debris. Have you ever had a twisted mass of clothing in the washing machine? Same principle. 

Yet in your plumbing system, the mess isn’t removed. Instead, it slowly moves down the pipes, and eventually into the sewer. It grows. It becomes more tangled. It builds. 

It’s time to remember what toilets are for. 

No more wipes. No more cotton balls. Or unwanted medicine. Or dental floss. 

If you’re not sure, don’t flush it. 

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