How To Get Rid Of Toilet Odor

It’s hard not to get swept up in the movement of poo-pourri. Why face embarrassing bathroom odors when you can get rid of them effortlessly? 

But sometimes those bathroom smells linger. No matter what you do, they seem to hang around. So you clean. And clean some more. What’s that lingering smell?

And more importantly, what can you do to get rid of it?How To Get Rid Of Toilet Odor

1. Improve bathroom ventilation. Bathrooms are often small, dark, windowless rooms in the depths of our homes. The reason odors stick around is there is no place for them to go. A consistent stream of air can make odors disappear. Turn on your ventilation system every time you use the bathroom. Be sure to use it when showering, as moist air can give your room a musty smell. If your ventilation system doesn’t seem to be working, it’s time to clean the ventilation fan, or replace it altogether. 

2. Clean your bathroom differently. Not all of those chemicals you’ll find on the shelves of your favorite big box store work the way you want them too. In fact, if you combine several of them together, you may be in for even more smells. And in some cases, the results can be dangerous, even deadly. It doesn’t take a lot of products to get your space clean. Baking soda, lemon juice, and vinegar can easily do the trick. If you want to add different smells, a few drops of essential oils will freshen the scent nicely. And be sure to clean out your drains regularly; trapped hair can prevent a lot of things from going down, and help create that lingering scent. 

3. Watch for biological growth. The bathroom is one of the most common places for biological growth to occur. You may think spotting it is easy, but it’s easy to mistake the warning signs. It can form under the toilet, in cracks and crevices, or even behind the walls. If your shower wasn’t installed right, water may be leaking right now every time you turn the water on. If you’re not sure if you have biological growth, but smells linger and won’t go away, it may be time to call in a plumber to take a look. 

4. Consider an upgrade. How old is your toilet? The odor may be due to a toilet that simply isn’t performing what it’s meant to do. The surface area could be worn out. Biological growth may be forming at the connection. And if it’s not low-flow technology, an upgrade would help you save water and energy consumption too. 

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